Facebook

CPW softens reporting requirements for food industry

Sewer Pretreatment Ordinance ready for City Council approval

By Jim Fair, Editor
Published on Friday, June 28, 2013

Enlarge photo

Randy Olson, CPW City Operations Manager, discusses the mapping of the Brushy Creek Outfall Sewer Rehabilitation project. CPW and the city agreed to split the cost $114,582 of the low bid. Both entities will pay $57, 291 each.

Randy Olson, CPW City Operations Manager, discusses the mapping of the Brushy Creek Outfall Sewer Rehabilitation project. CPW and the city agreed to split the cost $114,582 of the low bid. Both entities will pay $57, 291 each.

Greer CPW softened its reporting requirements for Greer businesses maintaining an in-ground grease interceptor maintenance log.

Commission of Public Works commissioners passed the Sewer Pretreatment Ordinance Thursday for businesses that prepare and serve food. It requires them to keep a monthly maintenance log and make it available to CPW officials to review during the agency’s annual inspection of the business. Commissioner Eugene Gibson and commissioners Jeff Howell and Perry Williams approved the ordinance.

At issue was requiring businesses to submit the maintenance log quarterly to CPW for fats, oils and grease management. Williams vigorously argued the reporting of the log created additional and unnecessary time small business owners would spend away from their operations.

Don Milner of CPW presented a slide of the maintenance log illustrating its completion would take minutes a month. Businesses would fill in the date of its maintenance, if the grease interceptor was cleaned and the method of removing the skimmed contents, i.e. trash or recycle bin. The report would be sent to CPW quarterly where Milner said his staff would confirm where the contents were sent off site.

“I’m not necessarily opposed to the program. I just find it an overreach with too much paperwork,” Williams said. “I am convinced that this is being an overreach of our government, especially for small business owners. They are inundated with forms.”

Howell cautioned commissioners to keep intact the integrity of the ordinance that has been aggressively updated after lying dormant for years.  “We are here for a reason because it started because of a problem,” he said. “I don’t want to do anything that takes away from (CPW’s) professionalism in administering this program. That’s my concern.”

A restaurant owner late Thursday said its form has not been maintained and offered it would be more convenient to provide the information electronically instead of by mail. CPW did not address electronic reporting.

Commissioners were told problem areas routinely occur in big neighborhoods or along rows of restaurants. Milner said businesses found in violation during CPW’s latest inspections are now in compliance.

Gibson asked commissioners to explain the outcome of the public hearing city council mandated last month. General Manager Nick Stegall said nearly 800 letters were sent to its customers and only four businesses responded – Pour Sports Pub and Sonic’s were the only restaurants.

“The main thing is to make sure Greer CPW doesn’t get into trouble with the state,” Milner said. Any spillage from businesses that would find its way into creeks or streams, for example, would become an issue involving DHEC.

CPW will present the ordinance to city council for second reading and approval, as early as July 9. It is expected to pass.

• CPW and the City of Greer will each pay half ($57,291) of the low bid of $114, 582 for the Brushy Creek Outfall Sewer Rehabilitation project.

• A resolution was approved for a $3.5 million interest free loan for 5 years from South Carolina Public Service Agency (aka "Santee Cooper") for the construction of an electrical substation at the Inland Port to be paid back before the end of the 5 years.


Share



Related Photo Galleries


Leave a Comment



Trending: Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport, Obituaries, Chon Restaurant, Allen Bennett Hospital