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Hannon to playact a healthcare issue on stage in 'Window Pains'

Thursday's performance at Cannon Centre is free with registration

By Jim Fair, Editor
Published on Monday, October 14, 2013

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Inez Hannon, front, is paired with Jay Babcock (her playacting husband) and Jeanine Halva-Neubauer as Virginia Lamb.

Greenville Health System Photo

Inez Hannon, front, is paired with Jay Babcock (her playacting husband) and Jeanine Halva-Neubauer as Virginia Lamb.



Enlarge photo

The play is a reader theater format, which allows actors to bring their lines with them on stage.

Greenville Health System Photo

The play is a reader theater format, which allows actors to bring their lines with them on stage.



Enlarge photo

The actors, said Inez Hannon, try to put themselves into somebody else’s frame of mind to convey the message.

Greenville Health System Photo

The actors, said Inez Hannon, try to put themselves into somebody else’s frame of mind to convey the message.



Enlarge photo

Greenville Health System Photo

"Window Pains" is a one-act play that eavesdrops on the medical conditions of 12 neighbors. The free play will be performed at the Cannon Centre Thursday at 6 p.m.



Inez Hannon may be playacting on stage but the message she delivers in “Window Pains” is real.

There is no massaging the script, written by Greenville playwright Anne Pecaro. The script doesn't take literary license to stray from fact to fiction. Humor is the vehicle that portrays real-life health symptoms to a mostly unsuspecting audience that may come face-to-face with a health issue that is threatening their or a family member or friend's quality of life.

Playing Darlene Munson in “Window Pains”, a one-act play that eavesdrops on the medical conditions of 12 neighbors, Hannon, from Greer, is part of the ensemble cast appearing at the Cannon Centre Thursday at 6 p.m. Claudia Jenkins, who works at Greer Memorial Hospital, is also in the cast.

The play, produced by Greenville Health System, is free and a panel discussion with GHS physicians will follow. Call 877-447-4636 for reservations.

Hannon, Community Relations Coordinator with GHS, discussed how she got involved in performing in the play, her role and the importance of the messages delivered.

Question. Did you ever think you would be acting in a play at the Cannon Centre?

Hannon:  For me it was very hard. It’s not my natural desire to get up in front of an audience, but I have enjoyed it. This is a stretch for me. But everything is a fun night (dinner and theater). Everything is positive and inspirational and you learn serious issues about health.

Q. What is your role?

Hannon. I am Darlene Munson, part of a couple and I am married to Judd Munson.  I am experiencing pre-menopause symptoms. It’s making fun of the way things are happening and what people may be going through. Everybody goes through it and we’re just trying to make people aware they are not alone.

Q. What’s the message the cast is trying to deliver?

Hannon. You may not be experiencing any symptoms like Alzheimer’s, heart disease, diabetes or you’re not able to lose weight. We try to put ourselves into somebody else’s frame of mind. It also shows us we have to be tolerant of people who are facing an illness.

Q. It appears by acting out the symptoms people may recognize that it will reflect a health issue they may have?

Hannon. Early detection is the key. It tells people if you have symptoms to find a physician and get diagnosed. Go to your general physician or a care facility. Here at the Greenville Health System we have doctors and nurses that can be of assistance.

Q: What are the doctors’ specialties participating in the forum?

Hannon: It depends on what is going on. This month is prostate health and breast health. We always try to make it relevant.

Q. Was it difficult to learn the script?

Hannon. Robyn (Zimmerman, Director of Public and Community Relations for GHS) calls it a reader theater format. Once you get in front of the audience you never know what will happen. The script is real.

Q. How do you prepare for a performance?

Hannon. Breathe deeply and just try not to be nervous.

Q. Do you look at the audience’s faces when you are performing?

Hannon:  I look up at the lights. Robyn tells us to look down to take our cues.

Q; What is your wardrobe like?

Hannon: My costume is worn down, at least it looks worn. I wear sweats and a sweatshirt.

Q. You appeared at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre about three weeks ago. How did that go?

Hannon: It’s rewarding when you have audiences react to you. There was a range of emotion people had with different characters. Having breast cancer to prepping for colonoscopy, a lot of people can relate.

Q: Has your family seen you act?

A: My mother-in-law saw the first one (three years ago). My parents saw this one. My kids haven’t seen me act.

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