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Thinking about getting a pet for Christmas? How to find the right one for your family

Published on Monday, November 25, 2019

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Thinking about getting a pet for Christmas? How to find the right one for your family
Family Features

Adding a four-legged friend to the family is no small decision, and it's easy to get distracted by sweet eyes pleading to be taken home. Becoming a dog parent is a major commitment, so it's important to do your research and make well-informed choices before deciding on a new dog.

No matter what stage of acquiring a dog you're in, educate yourself about your options. A resource like Be Dog Smart, an online tool designed to guide consumers through the process of looking for a dog, can help you every step of the way, regardless of whether you're considering getting a dog from a professional breeder, pet store, friend, family member or adopting from a shelter or rescue.

By asking the right questions, researching credible sources and requesting transparency from those who provide companion animals, you can rest assured you are taking the right steps to bring home a new furry family member.

Take smarter steps to bring your new fur-baby home with these tips from the Pet Leadership Council, the creators of the Be Dog Smart initiative:

  • Determine the responsible environment you would like to acquire your dog from. One way to ensure those who raise and supply dogs maintain proper care standards is to understand the acquisition process and thoroughly vet breeders, retailers, shelters and rescues before supporting their operations. Ask questions about their businesses, policies, animal care and referral sources. Visit the locations personally to get a sense for the environment before making a decision. Once you settle on a source for your dog, interview several options to determine the best fit.
  • Consider how a dog fits into your living situation. For example, if you work long hours, you'll need to consider ways for your dog to be let outside during the day. Although some breeds require less space for exercise, all dogs need daily activity and regular access to relieve themselves
  • Think about the time and monetary investment. Dogs typically do not understand being left in their crates because you have a busy work schedule or social life. Contemplate your available time and how you would adjust to accommodate your pet. The same can be said for your finances. Ensure you can afford essentials such as food, grooming items and veterinary care as well as extras like toys and treats before making the commitment.
  • Learn about the differences between purebred and mixed breeds. With so many breeds of dogs available, it's tough to know which one is the right fit for you. Purebred dogs, which are dogs whose parents belong to the same breed, offer predictability in size, appearance, temperament, health issues, grooming needs and energy level. Mixed breeds, whose parents come from different breeds or are mixed breeds themselves, have a lower chance of being born with inherited congenital diseases and often inherit only the best traits from each parent.
  • Weigh the benefits of a puppy versus an adult dog. Puppies are typically sweet and fun, and there are advantages to bonding with a puppy from its earliest stages of life. However, puppies quickly grow and can require a lot of work and training. Puppies are also more likely to be destructive. At rescues and shelters you'll often find older dogs, many who were abandoned due to their owner's life circumstances, not anything they did wrong. These dogs can be wonderful additions to a family and may be house trained and have previous basic command training, but there is a possibility of not getting a clear understanding of the dog's past.

For additional tips and to learn more, visit BeDogSmart.org.

Source: Pet Leadership Council

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