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Weather created interesting work week at Inland Port

Published on Thursday, June 13, 2013

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The demolition of Nordic began last week. The only remaining buildings to be removed are the homes on Moore Street.

Jim Fair

The demolition of Nordic began last week. The only remaining buildings to be removed are the homes on Moore Street.



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The mounds that anchored utility poles and power lines are gone. 

Jim Fair

The mounds that anchored utility poles and power lines are gone. 



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First flooding rains last weekend and on Thursday gusty winds blew dirt from the property to Hwy. 290. This car, parked along the Norfolk Southern railroad tracks, was getting a coating of dirt throughout the day.

Jim Fair

First flooding rains last weekend and on Thursday gusty winds blew dirt from the property to Hwy. 290. This car, parked along the Norfolk Southern railroad tracks, was getting a coating of dirt throughout the day.



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An airplane landing at the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport provides its passengers a clear view of the size of the Inland Port sandwiched between J. Verne Smith Highway and Hwy. 290.

Jim Fair

An airplane landing at the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport provides its passengers a clear view of the size of the Inland Port sandwiched between J. Verne Smith Highway and Hwy. 290.



The Greer Inland Port has had an unusual week of weather to overcome.

A record rainfall last Sunday created lake-like affects at the inland port that forced equipment to be moved to higher ground.

On Thursday, strong winds swirled the dirt throughout the graded port and coated vehicles with a layer of dirt.

Nordic, a cold storage warehouse, was demolished as the final industrial building to be razed. Houses along Moore street continue to be demolished and its materials removed. Several additional homes were purchased to provide additional land for Norfolk and Southern tracks.

Paving is about to begin at the port and the entry and the exit road at J. Verne Smith Parkway is being cut.

The inland port is being designed to accommodate electric rubber-tire gantry cranes (RTGs), as opposed to the standard diesel units. Three diesel RTGs are being moved from port facilities in Charleston to the inland port.

 

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