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Brushy Creek subdivisions denied by Planning Commission, big turnout of residents resist proposal

By Jim Fair, Editor
Published on Tuesday, June 21, 2016

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About 65 people showed up at the Greer Planning Commission Tuesday from the Brushy Creek community to voice opposition to two proposals for subdivisions across from each other.
 
 

Jim Fair

About 65 people showed up at the Greer Planning Commission Tuesday from the Brushy Creek community to voice opposition to two proposals for subdivisions across from each other.

 

 



Enlarge photo

Tim Elder, the developer for the two proposed Brushy Creek subdivisions, points to the map showing their locations across from each other.
 

Jim Fair

Tim Elder, the developer for the two proposed Brushy Creek subdivisions, points to the map showing their locations across from each other.

 



Enlarge photo

Jim Fair

"The beauty of Greer is going away with more density. Why don’t we talk about infrastructure before development?”

Gloria Vandenberg

 



Enlarge photo

Two residential subdivisions, proposed on Brushy Creek Road, were denied zoning and annexation requests Monday evening at the Greer Planning Commission.
 

Jim Fair

Two residential subdivisions, proposed on Brushy Creek Road, were denied zoning and annexation requests Monday evening at the Greer Planning Commission.

 



Two proposed Brushy Creek Road subdivisions, virtually across the street from each other were denied annexation and zoning requests Monday by the City Planning Commission.

About 65 people, mostly residents, packed the commission chambers to ask commissioners to deny the requests, which they did unanimously, 7-0.

Both zoning requests were for RM-2, single family residential, thus representing medium and high density housing.

One request was for 84 single family units on 21.05 acres at the southwest intersection of Brushy Creek Road and Alexander Road. The second proposal was for 52 single family homes to be built on 9.81 acres almost adjacent to Belshire subdivision on Brushy Creek Road and Alexander Road.

“I am trying to bring product into the market where the demand is in the market,” said developer Tim Elder. “If nothing else its fill-in community and we’re about two months out from being out of inventory.”

There was a wide gamut of opposition to the housing developments, mostly due to the proliferation of traffic.

Some comments included:

Bill Sayegh: “It’s not the traffic but the accidents that could occur there, people trying to get out of the subdivision.”

Stephen Ross: “I live in Belshire with 150 units. This will represent 800-1,000 more cars daily. I am asking for a fall traffic study when school is in.”

Brady Mashak: “I see traffic, schools and taxes effected by this.”

Kristen Johnson: "I don’t see a playground or pool.”

Gloria Vanderberg: “The quality of life is the essence – traffic, safety, getting out and schools. The beauty of Greer is going away with more density. Why don’t we talk about infrastructure before development?”

The commissioners tabled the new subdivisions on May 16 contingent on a traffic impact study. It had not been done and Elder told commissioners Monday he would acquiesce for a turn lane regardless of its results.

Public opposition to the proposed subdivisions was organized and professional addressing commissioners. Those that spoke stayed on topic.

Justin Kirtz, geographic information system planner, presented the staff’s recommendation:

“This portion of Brushy Creek Road is primarily a lower density residential area characterized by developing subdivisions and scattered single-family development and vacant land. It is for that reason that Greenville County’s Comprehensive Plan identifies it as such. The development residential subdivisions in the area will increase the present traffic volumes along Brushy Creek Road. Presently the widening of Brushy Creek Road is not identified to be considered for the next 20 years in the County’s Transportation Plan. The proposed RM-2 would allow for a higher density residential development pattern that currently exists in that area. It is staff’s opinion that rezoning this property as requested would create an inconsistent zoning and land use situation.”

Commissioner Brian Martin said the Belshire zoning of R-12 was appropriate for the density of the Brushy Creek Road area.

“We approved Belshire with the greater density (R-12) . I think R-12 is appropriate for this area. I would give recommendation to the council that the annexing be R-12.

The City Council will hear the requests in a first reading on July 12 at 6:30 p.m. A public forum is held for citizens to speak if signed up before the council meeting. The planning commissions denial is only a suggestion for council and can be affirmed or overturned.

 

 

 

 

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